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Vocabulary

YEET! and other new words in English

Feeling too old to read social media messages? We've got your back! Like any language, English is changing. Let's explore some of the newbies together.

ICYMI (in case you missed it)

used on social media when posting something that is not new

Example:
ICYMI, here's a link to her column in last Saturday's newspaper.

Sus

giving the impression that something is questionable or dishonest (suspicious)

Example:
It's a little sus that he seems to know exactly what to do in such situations.

Janky

very bad in quality or condition

Example:
The elevator in the library is so janky.

Yeet

used to show that you think something is funny or exciting

Example:
"I screwed up my test." - "Yeet!"

Permacrisis

a long period of great difficulty, confusion, or suffering that seems to have no end

Example:
He maintains that Europe is in a permacrisis that stretches beyond the pandemic, climate change, and war

Sportswashing

is a term used to describe the practice of individuals, groups, corporations, or governments using sports to improve reputations tarnished by wrongdoing

Example:
Flattering news spreads, celebrity spin doctors, and immersive atmospheres are among the signs of a troubling practice known as sportswashing.

Petfluencer

a person who gains a large following on social media by posting entertaining images or videos of their cat, dog, or other pet

Example:
Some of the most popular petfluencers include jiffpom, a Pomeranian with 9.5 million Instagram followers.

Cli-fi

a genre of fiction that deals with the impacts of climate change and global warming

Example:
Will cli-fi ever become as popular as sci-fi?

Tech neck

neck pain that’s caused by repetitive strain and injury to the muscles and other tissue structures of the cervical spine

Example:
“Tech neck” is the result of looking down at a phone or other screen for too long.

Copypasta

block of text copied and pasted to the internet and social media

Example:
The tweet became a copypasta, and was shared and applied to movies, TV shows, musicals, songs, and books

At

The use of “at” as a verb, particularly to argue with another person on social media or disagree with someone’s opinion.
“At” in this context stems from the @ sign, where people tag usernames to reply to content that they have shared.

Example:
The band’s second album was disappointing. Don’t at me.

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